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Surviving Decarbonization

August 3, 2015 by Jim Baird

Decarbonization and Planning

Using the ocean's heat sink to dump the ocean surface heat may be one of the very few feasible methods to reverse the seemingly irreversible phenomenon of global warming before all major species on earth become part of the sixth mass extinction.[read more]

Post-Sandy Rebuilding for Resiliency: Lessons From Long Beach, New York

July 31, 2015 by Steven Cohen

My small bungalow in Long Beach, New York, sits one half block from the bay and one and a half blocks from the ocean. Hurricane Sandy required a gut renovation of my home's ground floor and required my next-door neighbors to demolish their house and rebuild a new one. But rebuild they did.[read more]

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Fracking Time for a Step Back

July 29, 2015 by Steve Heisler
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Fracking Analysis

Fracking is one of the hottest environmental topics under discussion these days, and for good reason: Many known dangers exist. Additionally, there may be more problems we haven’t yet discovered, because the fracking process currently in use has a short safety track record.[read more]

June 2015 Hottest on Record: Super El Niño, Heatwaves, Record Precipitation and Drought

July 20, 2015 by Tom Schueneman

Climate Change and Record Whether

According to data released this week by the Japan Meteorological Agency, June 2015 was the hottest June in the global record. And on Wednesday NASA reported similar temperature findings, with 2015 tied with 1998 as the warmest on record.[read more]

The Politics of a Warming Arctic

July 17, 2015 by Tom Schueneman

Arctic Politics

In 1991 eight “arctic nations” signed the Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy, including Canada, the U.S. Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Russia. The AEPS identified six principal pollution issues: persistent organic pollutants, oil pollution, heavy metals, noise, radioactivity and acidification.[read more]

Who Killed the Urban Electric Car?

July 15, 2015 by Matt Conway
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EV Infrastructure

Electric vehicles offer one of the most promising options for improving the livability of urban environments. The benefits of switching to electrics in densely populated areas include improved air quality, reduced engine fluid run-off pollution and less risk of ground water contamination from petroleum storage.[read more]

Climate in the Arctic: Signs of Change, but Not Always!

July 10, 2015 by David Hone

Climate Change in the Arctic

I have just returned from a personal vacation expedition to the European high Arctic, starting in Longyearbyen, Svalbard and ending in Iceland via the East Coast of Greenland. The trip was on the National Geographic Explorer, a 148-passenger expedition class vessel with ice strengthening.[read more]

California Grid Expected to Maintain Reliability despite Drought

July 7, 2015 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy

California Energy and the Drought

According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), the bulk power system in the state of California is not expected to lose any grid reliability this summer, despite a long-lasting drought that has lowered hydroelectric generation.[read more]

Demand for Small Modular Reactors may be Impacted by Supreme Court Ruling on EPA Coal Plant Emissions

July 6, 2015 by Dan Yurman

SMRs and Supreme Court Rulings

The US Supreme Court recently threw out EPA’s coal emissions regulations that if implemented would have forced many utilities to close older coal-fired plants. The new emissions controls are aimed at mercury and other toxic pollutants which are not removed from stack emissions by current air pollution controls.[read more]

Supreme Court: EPA Should Have Considered Cost When Deciding Whether Mercury Limits For Power Plants Were Appropriate

July 2, 2015 by James Coleman

EPA Regulations and Considering Costs

The United States Supreme Court held that the Environmental Protection Agency improperly refused to consider costs when determining whether it was “appropriate and necessary” to regulate mercury emissions from power plants under the Clean Air Act.[read more]

Revising the Toxic Substances Out-of-Control Act

July 2, 2015 by Steven Cohen
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It's good that America had a bipartisan environmental majority in past, or our air today would be unbreathable and our water would be undrinkable. Fortunately, laws governing air and water pollution, solid and hazardous waste, endangered species, and toxic substances were enacted during those crucial decades.[read more]

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Watering Down the Energy Debate

June 29, 2015 by David Hess
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Energy Debate

Water is essential for the production of energy. Energy facilities both consume water and have impacts on the aquatic ecosystems they interact with. These interactions are complex however and it is a mistake to over-simplify – one we must avoid if we are to meet our future energy needs sustainably.[read more]

The Common Goals of the Pope and Clean Energy

June 26, 2015 by EDF Energy Exchange

The Pope and Clean Energy

Pope Francis turned a keen eye toward the environment and the problem of climate change with his encyclical,“Laudato Si” (“Praised Be”), released yesterday. As a clean energy advocate, I’m heartened that Pope Francis recognizes the need to transform our energy system.[read more]

On Pragmatic Conservation

There is a debate among conservationists over the future of protected areas. On one side are groups that do things like work with countries to site hydroelectric dams so they are less destructive. Then there's groups like the Center for Biological Diversity that sue governments to protect endangered species.[read more]

From Multi-Year Drought To Flash Flooding: "Weather Whiplash" Explained

June 4, 2015 by Joseph Romm
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Climate Change and Weather Whiplash

In a warming climate with more and more water vapor in the air, mega-droughts will tend to be interspersed with more intense rain storms — weather whiplash.[read more]