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Katrina 10 Years On: The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard Provides a Way Forward

August 28, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard

Federal Flood Standards

This month marks the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. It was the costliest, as well as, one of the deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. When the levee system safeguarding New Orleans catastrophically failed, our nation watched in horror as the flood waters spread.[read more]

Drought and Extremes of Heat Reduce Farm Yields and Worsen Wildfires

August 27, 2015 by Henry Auer
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Global Warming Damage Already Done

Man-made global warming worsens the extreme drought in the American West because of its excessive heating. Farms in California receive inadequate water supplies, leading to crop losses. Wildfires are burning record areas of forest in the West as well as in Alaska.[read more]

Katrina's Vital Lesson

August 26, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard

President Obama goes to New Orleans on Thursday to mark the Gulf region's struggle to recover from not one disaster but two: Hurricane Katrina and the collapse of the levee system that swamped the Crescent City 10 years ago this week. In some respects, the recovery has been remarkable.[read more]

U.S. Coastal Cities Face Increased Risk of Flooding

August 25, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard
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Coastal Flooding Risk

In the US, the economic, environmental and social impacts of flooding are severe. Flooding presents a serious risk to our physical infrastructure, which are essential to the well-being of the nation. Unfortunately, US coastal cities are facing an increased risk of severe flooding due to compound flooding.[read more]

Four Powerhouse Bills to Help California get to 50 Percent Renewable Energy

August 19, 2015 by EDF Energy Exchange

California Energy Bills

California is deep into the dog days of summer, and pressure is mounting on the state’s electric grid to keep up with demand. Luckily, California’s legislature is working to bring more clean energy resources to the grid, diversifying how we power our homes and businesses.[read more]

EPA Spilled, but Didn't Dump, the Toxics That Ended up in Colorado's River

August 18, 2015 by Steven Cohen

Last week, while inspecting leaks from a long-abandoned Colorado gold mine, EPA and its contractors accidentally breached the wall of an old mine tunnel, releasing an orange-colored toxic waste soup that flowed first into Cement Creek and then into the Animas River.[read more]

First Offshore Wind Farm in the United States Begins Construction

August 14, 2015 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy
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United States Offshore Wind

In July, American offshore wind developer, Deepwater Wind, installed the first foundation for what is expected to be the first offshore wind farm in the United States. The project will be located three miles southeast of Block Island, Rhode Island.[read more]

The Clean Power Plan Offers Hope for the Oceans

August 7, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard

Government Policy and Ocean Health

U.S. marine ecosystems and fisheries have long been an economic engine and cultural source of wealth for our country. Which is why we must take action against the triple threat carbon pollution poses for our oceans: ocean warming, reduced oxygen levels, and ocean acidification.[read more]

Surviving Decarbonization

August 3, 2015 by Jim Baird

Decarbonization and Planning

Using the ocean's heat sink to dump the ocean surface heat may be one of the very few feasible methods to reverse the seemingly irreversible phenomenon of global warming before all major species on earth become part of the sixth mass extinction.[read more]

Post-Sandy Rebuilding for Resiliency: Lessons From Long Beach, New York

July 31, 2015 by Steven Cohen

My small bungalow in Long Beach, New York, sits one half block from the bay and one and a half blocks from the ocean. Hurricane Sandy required a gut renovation of my home's ground floor and required my next-door neighbors to demolish their house and rebuild a new one. But rebuild they did.[read more]

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Fracking Time for a Step Back

July 29, 2015 by Steve Heisler
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Fracking Analysis

Fracking is one of the hottest environmental topics under discussion these days, and for good reason: Many known dangers exist. Additionally, there may be more problems we haven’t yet discovered, because the fracking process currently in use has a short safety track record.[read more]

June 2015 Hottest on Record: Super El Niño, Heatwaves, Record Precipitation and Drought

July 20, 2015 by Tom Schueneman

Climate Change and Record Whether

According to data released this week by the Japan Meteorological Agency, June 2015 was the hottest June in the global record. And on Wednesday NASA reported similar temperature findings, with 2015 tied with 1998 as the warmest on record.[read more]

The Politics of a Warming Arctic

July 17, 2015 by Tom Schueneman

Arctic Politics

In 1991 eight “arctic nations” signed the Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy, including Canada, the U.S. Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Russia. The AEPS identified six principal pollution issues: persistent organic pollutants, oil pollution, heavy metals, noise, radioactivity and acidification.[read more]

Who Killed the Urban Electric Car?

July 15, 2015 by Matt Conway
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EV Infrastructure

Electric vehicles offer one of the most promising options for improving the livability of urban environments. The benefits of switching to electrics in densely populated areas include improved air quality, reduced engine fluid run-off pollution and less risk of ground water contamination from petroleum storage.[read more]

Climate in the Arctic: Signs of Change, but Not Always!

July 10, 2015 by David Hone

Climate Change in the Arctic

I have just returned from a personal vacation expedition to the European high Arctic, starting in Longyearbyen, Svalbard and ending in Iceland via the East Coast of Greenland. The trip was on the National Geographic Explorer, a 148-passenger expedition class vessel with ice strengthening.[read more]