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US Supreme Court

Demand for Small Modular Reactors may be Impacted by Supreme Court Ruling on EPA Coal Plant Emissions

July 6, 2015 by Dan Yurman

SMRs and Supreme Court Rulings

The US Supreme Court recently threw out EPA’s coal emissions regulations that if implemented would have forced many utilities to close older coal-fired plants. The new emissions controls are aimed at mercury and other toxic pollutants which are not removed from stack emissions by current air pollution controls.[read more]

Supreme Court: EPA Should Have Considered Cost When Deciding Whether Mercury Limits For Power Plants Were Appropriate

July 2, 2015 by James Coleman

EPA Regulations and Considering Costs

The United States Supreme Court held that the Environmental Protection Agency improperly refused to consider costs when determining whether it was “appropriate and necessary” to regulate mercury emissions from power plants under the Clean Air Act.[read more]

U.S. Supreme Court Breathes New Life into FERC Order 745, Demand Response

May 8, 2015 by EDF Energy Exchange
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FERC Order Supreme Court Review

You’ve probably heard the saying “life is a journey,” but this could not be more true for EPSA v. FERC, the landmark demand response case clean energy experts have been eyeing for more than a year as it’s made its way through the United States legal system.[read more]

Supreme Court Leaves Room for State Regulation of Natural Gas Sales

April 27, 2015 by James Coleman

Recently, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the federal Natural Gas Act does not preempt the field of state antitrust regulation of natural gas prices, which means states can apply their own policies to natural gas sales as long as those policies do not conflict with federal law.[read more]

The EPA's Mercury Rule Will Cost The Economy At Least $16 Billion Per Year

April 6, 2015 by Brian H. Potts
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The Environmental Protection Agency says its new Mercury and Air Toxics Standard—the legality of which is before the U.S. Supreme Court this term—will produce $24 to $80 billion in net economic benefits to U.S. citizens by improving their health. But has the EPA doctored its benefit figures?[read more]

Environmental, Consumer Groups Unite in Asking Supreme Court to Hear Demand Response Case

February 23, 2015 by EDF Energy Exchange
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Demand Response and the Supreme Court

Earlier this week, EDF, along with 11 other environmental and consumer groups, joined forces in asking the Supreme Court to hear an important case involving an energy resource that saves families and businesses money, improves electric grid reliability, and reduces carbon emissions: demand response.[read more]

Another Step Forward for Demand Response: The Case of FERC Order 745

January 29, 2015 by EDF Energy Exchange

FERC and the Supreme Court

FERC Order 745 is a vital federal rule on demand response, which relies on people and technology, not power plants, to manage stress on the electric grid during periods of peak energy demand. But this critical energy management tool has also been subject to an amazing amount of scrutiny.[read more]

Demand Response Will 'Win Hands Down' if Taken Up by Supreme Court, Says Former FERC Chair

January 26, 2015 by Katherine Tweed

Jon Wellinghoff, former chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, did not mince words when talking about the potential outcome if the U.S. Supreme Court decides to review FERC Order 745, which was vacated last May by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.[read more]

FERC Files Supreme Court Challenge to Demand Response Decision

January 23, 2015 by Jeff St. John

A legal struggle over the future of demand response took another step forward last week, as the federal government officially filed a Supreme Court challenge to a lower court ruling that it says “seriously misinterpreted” federal law, with results that could be “tremendously damaging to the electricity system.”[read more]

The Supreme Court's Hidden Climate Agenda

December 29, 2014 by Brian H. Potts
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If you had to decide which air pollutant to regulate from the nation’s fleet of existing power plants: mercury - a toxic substance that adversely affects human health - or carbon dioxide - a greenhouse gas that many scientists believe is contributing to climate change—which would you choose?[read more]

New Development in Demand Response Ruling Signals Possible Supreme Court Review

December 18, 2014 by EDF Energy Exchange

Demand Response and Court Rulings

Demand response pays customers to conserve energy when the electric grid is stressed. With demand response, people and technology help meet energy demand. This is good news for the customers who pay less, the environment via reductions in emissions, and the electric grid by making it more efficient.[read more]

A Victory for Cleaner Fuels

July 8, 2014 by NRDC Switchboard
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On June 30, 2014, the last day of the term, the United States Supreme Court declined to hear the oil companies' and ethanol manufacturers' appeals in the California low carbon fuel standard case. This is a step forward in California's fight to clean up motor vehicle fuel sold in the state.[read more]

U.S. Supreme Court Narrows Greenhouse Gas Rules: What It Means for the U.S. Climate Agenda

June 25, 2014 by James Coleman

​In their recent ruling Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA, the Supreme Court struck down a portion of the United States’ first regulations for greenhouse gas emissions from industrial sources. This is the first Supreme Court decision on EPA’s authority to regulate greenhouse gases from industrial sources.[read more]

EPA Proposes New Power Plant Emissions Standards

June 8, 2014 by Tom Schueneman

EPA Plant Standards

In the 2007 case Massachusetts v. EPA, the Supreme Court ruled that the EPA had authority and obligation to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles. The decision also required the EPA to regulate these gasses unless it could provide a specific scientific basis for refusing such action.[read more]

What Will the Supreme Court's Latest Climate-Change Case Mean?

May 19, 2014 by David Doniger

The Supreme Court will soon decide its third case on climate-changing carbon pollution in the last seven years. The earlier cases clearly established the Environmental Protection Agency’s authority to set standards under the Clean Air Act to curb carbon pollution from both vehicles and factories.[read more]