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public health risk


Avoiding(?) The Next Fukushima

September 11, 2015 by Robert Hargraves

Nuclear Risk and Planning

The Fukushima disaster is ending. No member of the public was injured by radiation. People are moving back home. Processed, mildly radioactive water is being released into the sea. Japan nuclear power plants are being restarted and world-wide construction resumed.[read more]

NRC Calls Off Expensive Search for Witches

September 11, 2015 by Rod Adams

The NRC announced that it would stop funding the National Academy of Sciences’s effort to study whether or not populations that are exposed to radiation doses that are a tiny fraction of average background radiation related to proximity to licensed nuclear energy have an elevated risk of contracting cancer.[read more]

China's First 3rd-Party Study on Regional Air Quality Management Across 30 Provinces

September 2, 2015 by Jenny Tang

China Air Quality

In 2013, China State Council issued the Air Pollution Prevention and Control Action Plan 2013-2017 (aka “Ten Measures of Air”), setting a new precedent for governmental air pollution management efforts. One year after the Action Plan’s launch, what have China’s provinces and cities done to meet these requirements?[read more]

Climate Change Variability, Not Just Temperatures, Increase Mortality Risks for Vulnerable Populations

July 30, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard

Climate and health research has shown that weather extremes fueled by climate change are seriously threatening human health. It is well-known by the public health community that average seasonal mean temperatures significantly influence the risk of weather-related mortality.[read more]

New Research Project to Investigate How Communities can Tackle Fuel Poverty, the Silent Killer

July 29, 2015 by Sussex Energy Group

Fuel Poverty and Health Risk

New research to be conducted on the issue of fuel poverty will help researchers, and energy and community policy makers to understand just how it is that community groups could reach the vulnerable and what potential impact local activities could have.[read more]


Watering Down the Energy Debate

June 29, 2015 by David Hess

Energy Debate

Water is essential for the production of energy. Energy facilities both consume water and have impacts on the aquatic ecosystems they interact with. These interactions are complex however and it is a mistake to over-simplify – one we must avoid if we are to meet our future energy needs sustainably.[read more]

Clean Air and Health to Co-Benefit from More Stringent US Power Plant Carbon Standards, Study Suggests

June 8, 2015 by Roman Kilisek

Carbon Standards and Public Health

A new study sheds light on looming key policy choices to be made by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in finalizing the Clean Power Plan this summer. The peer-reviewed study has recently been published in the online edition of “Nature Climate Change.”[read more]

Heat Wave Preparedness in Action: What Ahmedabad is Doing Right Now

June 1, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard

India Heat Risk

The tragic heat wave in India - with a current death toll over 1,800 - has raised a lot of attention to the dire threat of rising temperatures. The question many are asking is, what can local governments do to prepare for future heat waves and mitigate the terrible effects of heat on people?[read more]

Colorado Health Officials Debunk Lung Association's Ozone 'Report Card'

May 15, 2015 by Simon Lomax

Colorado’s health department and the state’s top air quality regulator have sharply criticized claims by the ALA about ozone levels in the Denver area. Citing its own “report card” on the region’s air quality, they said that levels of ground-level ozone – smog – are deteriorating rather than improving.[read more]

Energy Quote of the Day: "This is Not Just a Future Threat"

April 17, 2015 by Edward Dodge

Obama and the Climate Change Threat

President Obama is arguing that climate change is a public health hazard, as the White House launches a new initiative aimed at addressing the impacts a warming planet has on communities. These initiatives are intended to address smog, allergies and the increasing risk of extreme-weather-related injuries.[read more]

Five Surprising Public Health Facts About Fukushima

April 8, 2015 by Breakthrough Institute

Fukushima and Measured Risk

Four years ago an earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan. 15,000 people were killed. A subsequent nuclear meltdown added fear to grief. As terrible as the meltdown was, the radiation did not have significant public health consequences, much less the catastrophic ones that many feared and some continue to claim.[read more]

Ozone Pollution in the West: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

March 24, 2015 by EDF Energy Exchange

Ozone in Western States

Long familiar in major urban areas, smog – what we experts call “ground-level ozone” pollution – is quickly becoming a serious problem in the rural mountain west, thanks to rapid expansion in oil and gas development.[read more]

Who in the United States will be Most Harmed by Ocean Acidification?

March 12, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard

In 2007, when Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery in Oregon experienced extreme die-offs of baby oysters, the company became the first known economic victim of ocean acidification in the United States. Ocean acidification continues to worsen as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise.[read more]

Why Divest? The Substantial Harm of Fossil Fuels

March 12, 2015 by Cutler Cleveland

What principles should be used to make a decision regarding divestment from fossil fuels? One principle is the existence and degree of harm caused by the use of fossil fuels. And a prodigious body of evidence indicates that the fossil energy system causes pervasive human health, environmental, and social harm.[read more]

Nuclear Energy: The Sixty-Year Pitch

February 18, 2015 by Peter Dykstra

Nuclear Energy Planning and History

In 1954, Atomic Energy Commission Chair Lewis Strauss envisioned a day when “our children will enjoy in their homes electrical energy too cheap to meter.” Strauss was placing his bets on nuclear fusion, which, sixty years later, is still on the drawing board. And the meters are still ticking away.[read more]