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state policy

Major Fossil Fuel-Producing States Rely Heavily on Severance Taxes

August 24, 2015 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy

Fossil Fuel Production and Taxes

Severance taxes accounted for less than 2% of state tax collections in 2014, but in three states severance taxes provided a much larger share of total state tax revenue in that year. Pennsylvania is considering a severance tax, and currently derives less than 1% of its revenues from a well head fee.[read more]

EPA's Clean Power Plan Puts States in the Driver's Seat

August 5, 2015 by Bob Perciasepe

The finalization today of EPA’s Clean Power Plan offers Americans a clear, realistic roadmap for addressing planet-warming emissions that threaten the environment and the U.S. economy. Most importantly, it puts states in the driver’s seat to devise innovative strategies to reduce emissions.[read more]

California Dreamin' of Distributed Energy Resources, as Utilities File Plans

July 13, 2015 by Lexie Briggs

California and State Energy Policy

In many ways, California is a special case. With an economy about the same size of Canada’s ($2.3 trillion in 2014) and a population of more than 38 million (roughly one in eight Americans is a Californian), California’s energy policies affect huge numbers of people and a large portion of the American economy.[read more]

Hawaii and Vermont Set High Renewable Portfolio Standard Targets

July 6, 2015 by U.S. EIA: Today in Energy
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State Renewable Portfolio Standards

Two states recently passed legislation that would require significant increases in renewable electricity generation. On June 8, Hawaii updated legislation setting a 100% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) by 2045. On June 11, Vermont passed a bill creating a 75% RPS by 2032.[read more]

North Carolina Solar Leadership at the Crossroads

June 30, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard
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Solar in the States

As a North Carolinian, I can tell you it's pretty darned amazing that, last year, our state was number 2 in the nation in installed solar capacity. And number 4 in the first quarter of 2015, despite what can only be described as some really crappy (and construction-slowing) winter weather.[read more]

What Put California at the Top of Residential Solar?

May 27, 2015 by Severin Borenstein
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Solar in California

California leads the nation in residential solar photovoltaic installations. In fact, nearly half of all systems installed have been in the Golden State. So why is California the leader? Sure, California has plenty of sunshine, but there are many other states that can compete on that dimension.[read more]

Wants Versus Needs: The Struggle to Realize New York's Energy Vision

May 27, 2015 by Katherine Tweed

In 2009, National Grid chose ABB for a SCADA/EMS system that would allow for more modern and integrated visibility into its electric transmission and distribution networks in Massachusetts and New York. Earlier this year, the system went into service.[read more]

An Economic Case To Prevent Solar Power's Sunset In North Carolina

May 22, 2015 by Jesse Grossman
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Solar energy has been a continuing economic boom for the state of North Carolina, but four critical policies to the state's solar market growth are jeopardized by pending legislation - will smart policy decisions keep the sun shining on the Tarheel State?[read more]

Canadian Hydropower can Help States Achieve Carbon-Cutting Goals

May 5, 2015 by Kyle Aarons
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Canadian Hydro and State Carbon Policies

About 10 percent of Canadian electricity, much of it generated from hydropower, is exported to the United States. With Canada expected to expand its hydropower capacity in coming years, could some states take advantage of this non-emitting resource to meet goals to reduce carbon emissions?[read more]

While Most Wait for the Federal Government, California May Have Just Broken the Methane Puzzle Wide Open

May 1, 2015 by EDF Energy Exchange

California and Methane Risk and Policy

Methane from oil and gas operations is a serious climate risk, but also a ripe opportunity to make a huge dent in overall greenhouse emissions. This past week, the state of California took a big, and long-awaited, step to address the challenge.[read more]

These States Are Early Leaders in U.S. Energy Storage Market

March 31, 2015 by Eric Wesoff

Energy Storage State Leaders

Energy storage is a small market undergoing fierce growth. The U.S. installed 61.9 megawatts of storage in 2014, and 220 megawatts are predicted to be installed in 2015. But, like the solar industry, storage projects are clustered in states with incentives, or where markets are able to place a value on storage.[read more]

FEMA Finalizes New Requirement for State Disaster Plans to Consider Climate Change Impacts

March 18, 2015 by NRDC Switchboard

The Federal Emergency Management Agency recently announced a change in its requirements for State Hazard Mitigation Plans. These plans, which states develop in order to prepare for future natural disasters, must now consider the projected effects of climate change on hazard risks.[read more]

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State Level Methane Taxes: Economic and Environmental Benefit

March 5, 2015 by Nathan Ratledge

While federal greenhouse gas taxes remain elusive, localized benefits make state-based methane taxes politically feasible. A methane tax would also be more comprehensive, efficient and effective than technology standards like that imposed by Colorado.[read more]

Clean Power Plan vs. Reliability: A False Dilemma for States

March 4, 2015 by Caitlin Marquis
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States and the Clean Power Plan

Ever since the EPA released its proposed Clean Power Plan last June, critics have raised concerns that the proposed regulation might jeopardize the reliability of our electricity system. Reliability has become a key policy talking-point, and for good reason: Nobody wants to see the lights go off.[read more]

Nuance or Nuisance: the Challenge of State-Level Incentives in Renewable Energy Development

States and Renewables Policy

A market closes, a market opens – such are the sharp ups and downs currently inherent to renewables development. Incentives in the US are currently decided at the state level. This adds challenge to an already inherently complex business, and more should be done to create parallel structures across state lines.[read more]